Ford On Film

Chronicles of a silver screen addict

Category Archives: Reviews

Ranking each segment in The Ballad of Buster Scruggs

Returning to the Wild West for the first time since 2010’s True Grit, the Coen Brothers have partnered with Netflix to produce The Ballad of Buster Scruggs. An anthology of stories involving singing cowboys, bandits, bounty hunters, and gold prospectors, The Ballad of Buster Scruggs is as inconsistent as most anthology films, but there are …

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Await Further Instructions is the fun, gory alternative to watch on Christmas Day

If you sat down on Christmas Day to watch your VHS copy of John Carpenter’s The Thing, only to discover the tape had warped and merged with copies of Videodrome, Tetsuo: The Iron Man and The Twilight Zone, you might just end up with something like Await Further Instructions, a claustrophobic Christmas-themed horror from director Johnny …

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A Star is Born is a melodramatic musical masterpiece

A tale almost as old as cinema itself, A Star is Born has been remade and reworked so many times, it’s hard to imagine anybody bringing something new to the story. Thank God for first time director Bradley Cooper, who manages to create a thoroughly charming, unashamedly melodramatic take on Hollywood’s favourite rags-to-riches story. Cooper …

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Possum is a deeply disturbing feature debut for Garth Marenghi himself, Matthew Holness

In the fourteen years since writing and starring in cult horror spoof Garth Marenghi’s Darkplace, one of the finest British comedies of the 00s, Matthew Holness has been relatively quiet. While co-stars Richard Aoyade, Matt Berry, and Alice Lowe starred in award-winning sitcoms and became independent film directors, Holness stayed out of the limelight, writing stories …

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Leeds International Film Festival: British and International Fantasy Shorts review

Yesterday, I was lucky enough to be able to attend the Leeds International Film Festival’s British and International Fantasy Short Films screenings in the gorgeous Everyman Cinema. A mixture of gory shlock, Twilight Zone-esque sci-fi, eerie character studies and classical horror tropes, the two screenings were an absolute blast. I thought I’d give a quick …

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A former Disney star sheds his image with the disturbing My Friend Dahmer

My Friend Dahmer is unique amongst biopics about serial killers. Rather than focusing on the grisly murders and eventual arrest of Jeffrey Dahmer, Marc Myers’ directorial debut looks at Dahmer’s teenage years, his formative experiences and the troubling influences and interests that eventual led to him brutally murdering 17 men and boys. Though My Friend …

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The Rider blurs the lines of fact and fiction with impressive results

The story behind Chloe Zhao’s The Rider is truly remarkable. In 2015, Zhao met cowboy Brady Jandreau at the Pine Ridge reservation and instantly knew she wanted to make a film about him. Unfortunately, she couldn’t figure out his story; that was, until he suffered a near-fatal riding accident and had to retire from riding …

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Bojack Horseman takes gimmick episodes to new heights in its outstanding fifth season

Since premiering to mediocre reactions (by critics who were unaware of creator Raphael Bob-Waksberg’s serious intentions) in 2014, Bojack Horseman has gone from strength to strength. Praised for its honest depiction of depression, furious political attacks (on subjects as controversial as sexual assault, gun control and abortion) and unique gimmick episodes, the show has rightly …

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Ghost Stories struggles to translate from stage to screen

Adapting a stage play into a feature film is tricky. What makes a piece work in a theatre – intimacy, intensity, immediacy – can fall flat when viewed in the cinema. This is especially true of horror. Just look at James Watkins’ 2012 adaptation of The Woman in Black: unbearably frightening on-stage, the film adaptation was …

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A hunting trip goes badly wrong in the tense, gripping Calibre

Though the basic premise – two old friends go on a hunting trip and run into violence– sounds like a Deliverance-style backwoods horror, Matt Palmer’s directorial debut Calibre is actually a sophisticated, sharply-written psychological thriller. Utilising its low budget and limited locations to deliver a tense, atmospheric morality tale, the Netflix-distributed film is among the …

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