Ford On Film

Chronicles of a silver screen addict

Category Archives: Reviews

Hereditary will traumatise you for life

Having shocked and appalled viewers with controversial short films The Strange Thing About The Johnsons and Munchausen, director Ari Aster aims to traumatise the masses with his feature debut Hereditary. A dark, deeply disturbing story of grief, family trauma and possession, the film might be narratively inconsistent and a little familiar, but one thing is …

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Catching up with Coco

The problem with creating a ‘Best Of’ list at the end of each year is that some terrific films inevitably fall through the cracks. As much as I’d love to see every major film of 2018 by the end of December, I already know I’ll miss some underrated gems, box office hits and other terrific …

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Lean On Pete is a beautiful, bruising journey across the underclass of America

Following Andrea Arnold, Andrew Haigh is the latest British director to take a road trip across the poor, rural regions of the United States. Where Arnold’s American Honey saw freedom and community in the desert landscapes, Haigh’s Lean On Pete sees nothing but dead ends. The thoroughly downbeat story of a teenage boy left to …

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If you want blood, entertaining grindhouse thriller Revenge has plenty of it

The rape-revenge film is a tricky one to pull off. Focus too much on the horrific act itself, and you’re likely to create a lurid, repulsive mess (see: I Spit On Your Grave). Skip over the rape entirely, and you risk trivialising a subject that should be taken seriously. There are few truly successful entries …

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Charlize Theron gives an outstanding performance in the otherwise-predictable Tully

After directing two critically-reviled dramas in 2013’s Labor Day and 2014’s Men, Women and Children, Jason Reitman has reunited with Diablo Cody and Charlize Theron, respective writer and star of his 2011 black comedy Young Adult, for another bruising comedy drama. Focusing on the pressures and struggles of motherhood, Tully is another fantastic showcase for …

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Lynne Ramsay makes a welcome return with the nerve-shredding You Were Never Really Here

Since her 1999 directorial debut Ratcatcher, Lynne Ramsay has graced cinemagoers with just three subsequent films. 2002’s Morvern Callar stripped a novel famed for its first person-narration of any inner monologue, giving Samantha Morton her greatest role as a quiet checkout girl who reacts blankly when her boyfriend commits suicide. Nine years later, she returned …

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Phantom Thread is another hypnotic, elusive dream from Paul Thomas Anderson

Is Paul Thomas Anderson the U.S.’s greatest living filmmaker?. Since the release of his mainstream breakthrough Boogie Nights in 1997, Anderson has released multiple masterpieces, each one completely different from the last. Even his lesser films, like 2014’s messy Inherent Vice, offer great performances and stylish cinematography, whilst his best films, like 2007’s Oscar-winning There …

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Gerald’s Game is a faithful Stephen King adaptation – to a fault

Is it fair to say the best Stephen King adaptations tend to ditch most of his material? The Shawshank Redemption swapped its Irish protagonist for Morgan Freeman. Stanley Kubrick changed almost everything about The Shining. Even this year’s It, one of the most successful horror films of all time, removed King’s infamously disturbing sewer scene. …

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I Am Not A Witch is a mesmerising look at modern day witch trials

It might seem unthinkable that a film set in 2017 could depict a young girl being convicted of witchcraft, but that’s the situation in a remote village in Zambia, the setting for Rungano Nyoni’s terrific debut feature I Am Not A Witch. Mixing biting satire with coming-of-age tragedy, Nyoni has crafted one of the most …

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Robert Pattinson gives a career-best performance in the thrilling Good Time

Since catapulting into the A-list (and the hearts of teenage girls) with the Twilight series, Robert Pattinson has been on a mission. Rejecting mainstream leading roles, he has instead been quietly trailblazing across the independent film scene for the last five years; working with legendary auteurs (David Cronenberg, Werner Herzog) and indie darlings (James Gray, Brady …

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